Install Theme

Your web-browser is very outdated, and as such, this website may not display properly. Please consider upgrading to a modern, faster and more secure browser. Click here to do so.

Chaos Spectre

Hello, my name is Spectre, and I am here with a message. For those of you who have lost yourself, for those of you who think you are forever gone, for those of you who feel like what you want is impossible, I am living proof that you are wrong. You can become who you want to be, even if you don't know who that is. Just never give up. My blog is focused on the roots it started on, steampunk, horror, and the surreal, but as my life developed, things like herbalism, human equality, unorthodox medicine, my own writings, and music all started to slip in. As per when I write this, these will become part of my blog, because this is MY blog, and I can run it as I please. I hope you enjoy, and if you wish to know more about how I found who I am, check the "about me" page. Thank you for visiting.
Sep 15 '14

trust:

me: it’s too hot

me: *opens window*

*in comes 20 flies, 8 spiders, 17 daddy long legs, 50 moths, 3 dragons and 12 Jehovah’s witnesses*

(Source: trust)

Sep 15 '14
afro-dominicano:

Brain Scans Link Concern for Justice With Reason, Not Emotion


  People who care about justice are swayed more by reason than emotion. That is the unexpected finding of new brain scan research from the University of Chicago department of Psychology and Center for Cognitive and Social Neuroscience.
  
  Psychologists have found that some individuals react more strongly than others to situations that invoke a sense of justice — for example, seeing a person being treated unfairly, or with mercy. The new study used brain scans to analyze the thought processes of people with high “justice sensitivity.”
  
  “We were interested to examine how individual differences about justice and fairness are represented in the brain to better understand the contribution of emotion and cognition in moral judgment,” explained lead author Jean Decety, the Irving B. Harris Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry.
  
  Using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) brain-scanning device, the team studied what happened in the participants’ brains as they judged videos depicting behavior that was morally good or bad. For example, they saw a person put money in a beggar’s cup or kick the beggar’s cup away. The participants were asked to rate on a scale how much they would blame or praise the actor seen in the video. People in the study also completed questionnaires that assessed cognitive and emotional empathy, as well as their justice sensitivity.
  
  As expected, study participants who scored high on the justice sensitivity questionnaire assigned significantly more blame when they were evaluating scenes of harm, Decety said. They also registered more praise for scenes showing a person helping another individual.
  
  But the brain imaging also yielded surprises. During the behavior-evaluation exercise, people with high justice sensitivity showed more activity than average participants in parts of the brain associated with higher-order cognition. Brain areas commonly linked with emotional processing were not affected.
  
  The conclusion was clear, Decety said: “Individuals who are sensitive to justice and fairness do not seem to be emotionally driven. Rather, they are cognitively driven.”
  
  According to Decety, one implication is that the search for justice and the moral missions of human rights organizations and others do not come primarily from sentimental motivations, as they are often portrayed. Instead, that drive may have more to do with sophisticated analysis and mental calculation.
  
  Decety adds that evaluating good actions elicited relatively high activity in the region of the brain involved in decision-making, motivation and rewards. This finding suggests that perhaps individuals make judgments about behavior based on how they process the reward value of good actions as compared to bad actions.
  
  “Our results provide some of the first evidence for the role of justice sensitivity in enhancing neural processing of moral information in specific components of the brain network involved in moral judgment,” Decety said.
  
  UChicago Psychology doctoral student Keith Yoder is a co-author on the paper, which was published in the March 19 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience.

afro-dominicano:

Brain Scans Link Concern for Justice With Reason, Not Emotion

People who care about justice are swayed more by reason than emotion. That is the unexpected finding of new brain scan research from the University of Chicago department of Psychology and Center for Cognitive and Social Neuroscience.

Psychologists have found that some individuals react more strongly than others to situations that invoke a sense of justice — for example, seeing a person being treated unfairly, or with mercy. The new study used brain scans to analyze the thought processes of people with high “justice sensitivity.”

“We were interested to examine how individual differences about justice and fairness are represented in the brain to better understand the contribution of emotion and cognition in moral judgment,” explained lead author Jean Decety, the Irving B. Harris Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry.

Using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) brain-scanning device, the team studied what happened in the participants’ brains as they judged videos depicting behavior that was morally good or bad. For example, they saw a person put money in a beggar’s cup or kick the beggar’s cup away. The participants were asked to rate on a scale how much they would blame or praise the actor seen in the video. People in the study also completed questionnaires that assessed cognitive and emotional empathy, as well as their justice sensitivity.

As expected, study participants who scored high on the justice sensitivity questionnaire assigned significantly more blame when they were evaluating scenes of harm, Decety said. They also registered more praise for scenes showing a person helping another individual.

But the brain imaging also yielded surprises. During the behavior-evaluation exercise, people with high justice sensitivity showed more activity than average participants in parts of the brain associated with higher-order cognition. Brain areas commonly linked with emotional processing were not affected.

The conclusion was clear, Decety said: “Individuals who are sensitive to justice and fairness do not seem to be emotionally driven. Rather, they are cognitively driven.”

According to Decety, one implication is that the search for justice and the moral missions of human rights organizations and others do not come primarily from sentimental motivations, as they are often portrayed. Instead, that drive may have more to do with sophisticated analysis and mental calculation.

Decety adds that evaluating good actions elicited relatively high activity in the region of the brain involved in decision-making, motivation and rewards. This finding suggests that perhaps individuals make judgments about behavior based on how they process the reward value of good actions as compared to bad actions.

“Our results provide some of the first evidence for the role of justice sensitivity in enhancing neural processing of moral information in specific components of the brain network involved in moral judgment,” Decety said.

UChicago Psychology doctoral student Keith Yoder is a co-author on the paper, which was published in the March 19 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience.

Sep 15 '14
maneth985:

harzilla:

fallen-angel-with-a-shotgun:

dajo42:

if you dont have me on facebook you are probably not missing out on any posts but the comment section is important too lmao

I went to the Renaissance faire dressed as a warrior.  I had a real sword with me, too.  I was standing (in character) next to a sword-fighting ring, where kids of all ages got the chance to pick up a sword and challenge the champion.  Some woman walks by, with her little girl.  The girl starts walking towards the ring, saying she wants to fight.  But the mom pulled her away hella sharply, and was like, “That’s for boys.”  You don’t want to be a BOY, do you?”    And the girl looked around and saw me.  I think she thought I was a boy; I had my hair in a ponytail, and was wearing a hood.  So she comes up to me and asks me, “Do you think girls can be fighters, too?”  And her mom looks like she’s silently gloating.  Like she thinks I’m going to say no.  So I take off my hood, untie my hair so that it flows freely, and kneel before her.  And I’m like, “Milady, anyone can be a fighter.”  I swear, the look on that mother’s face made my day.

-

maneth985:

harzilla:

fallen-angel-with-a-shotgun:

dajo42:

if you dont have me on facebook you are probably not missing out on any posts but the comment section is important too lmao

I went to the Renaissance faire dressed as a warrior.  I had a real sword with me, too.  I was standing (in character) next to a sword-fighting ring, where kids of all ages got the chance to pick up a sword and challenge the champion.  Some woman walks by, with her little girl.  The girl starts walking towards the ring, saying she wants to fight.  But the mom pulled her away hella sharply, and was like, “That’s for boys.”  You don’t want to be a BOY, do you?”    And the girl looked around and saw me.  I think she thought I was a boy; I had my hair in a ponytail, and was wearing a hood.  So she comes up to me and asks me, “Do you think girls can be fighters, too?”  And her mom looks like she’s silently gloating.  Like she thinks I’m going to say no.  So I take off my hood, untie my hair so that it flows freely, and kneel before her.  And I’m like, “Milady, anyone can be a fighter.”  I swear, the look on that mother’s face made my day.

-

Sep 15 '14

itsstuckyinmyhead:

Tumblr Puns 

Sep 14 '14
ohgodwhatamidoing:

"… boots with the fur (with the fur)"

ohgodwhatamidoing:

"… boots with the fur (with the fur)"

(Source: heroingranola)

Sep 14 '14

konasaur:

So I recently got a new computer.

I think my old computer was trying to tell me something.

image

uhimage

okimage

sure
image

Oh, okay, it’s probably just the boot up screen acting weird?

image

image

NOPE

image

image

Made browsing sixpenceee’s stuff more fun though

image

Even finding nemo became slightly more eerie

imageimage

EVEN OBAMA

image

Sep 14 '14
vancity604778kid:

fifty-shades-of-shade:

wetravelfast00:

geatc:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts, Follow Ultrafacts

This country is really absurd sometimes…

But we know we love it, though.

that’s why when I say “sorry” to ppl in the states they always dismiss my display of empathy saying “why are you saying sorry? it’s not your fault.” of course it’s not my fault! I want to help u feel bettah gawddd



"Sorry" means something different in Canada than it does in other places.
In Canada, if something bad happens and you say sorry, it means “I acknowledge that you have been inconvenienced or otherwise harmed, and I am expressing sympathy. I’d prefer it if the bad thing had not happened.”
We apologize for things constantly.
"Sorry I’m late, traffic was horrible!" Sorry about the traffic.
"Ugh, I think I caught the flu!" Sorry you have the flu. That must be unpleasant.
"My house was burglarized and everything of value stolen!" Oh wow, I’m sorry. That’s a terrible experience.
And so on. It’s rude not to apologize, because failing to apologize suggests you do not care.
There is even commercials up here in Canada about how we Canadians like to apologize for everything.
Sorry.

vancity604778kid:

fifty-shades-of-shade:

wetravelfast00:

geatc:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts, Follow Ultrafacts

This country is really absurd sometimes…

But we know we love it, though.

that’s why when I say “sorry” to ppl in the states they always dismiss my display of empathy saying “why are you saying sorry? it’s not your fault.” of course it’s not my fault! I want to help u feel bettah gawddd

"Sorry" means something different in Canada than it does in other places.

In Canada, if something bad happens and you say sorry, it means “I acknowledge that you have been inconvenienced or otherwise harmed, and I am expressing sympathy. I’d prefer it if the bad thing had not happened.”

We apologize for things constantly.

"Sorry I’m late, traffic was horrible!"
Sorry about the traffic.

"Ugh, I think I caught the flu!"
Sorry you have the flu. That must be unpleasant.

"My house was burglarized and everything of value stolen!"
Oh wow, I’m sorry. That’s a terrible experience.

And so on. It’s rude not to apologize, because failing to apologize suggests you do not care.

There is even commercials up here in Canada about how we Canadians like to apologize for everything.

Sorry.

Sep 14 '14

frustrational:

kim-jong-chill:

i’m just going to leave this here

Wow.

Sep 13 '14

haleepls:

hold-a-lover-close:

owlturdcomix:

We go forward.

This is too deep to comprehend.

Stop it

Sep 11 '14
ultrafacts:

Source If you want more facts, follow Ultrafacts

ultrafacts:

Source If you want more facts, follow Ultrafacts

Sep 11 '14

fight the power!
The thought of this being printed by that printer makes this all the better

fight the power!

The thought of this being printed by that printer makes this all the better

(Source: theinturnetexplorer)

Sep 11 '14

otherwindow:

bayonetta’s portrayal of mothers, daughters, sisters, and female and male friends protecting each other from a genocidal patriarchal religion is very important to me

Sep 11 '14
samw1se:

underage-fangirl:

joelayheymanasdicks:

sobsbcyoutubers:

skin-like-snowflakes:

masterdust:

uncannibal:

guccipoop:

Beautiful

I THOUGHT IT WAS SO FLOWY AND COOL AND SO ODD LIKE WOW ITS LIKE THE PERFECT SHAPE TO FLOW DOWN AND DROP LIKE THAT AND THEN I REALIZED IT WAS A BUNCH OF MINIATURE DICKS SO I WAS JUST„, “OH”

I thought they were peanuts

At first glance I saw jellybeans

I thought they were babies help

I thought it was a human spine…..

The dicks only make it better

WAY TO CUT OFF THE BEST PART OF THE WHOLE GIF

samw1se:

underage-fangirl:

joelayheymanasdicks:

sobsbcyoutubers:

skin-like-snowflakes:

masterdust:

uncannibal:

guccipoop:

Beautiful

I THOUGHT IT WAS SO FLOWY AND COOL AND SO ODD LIKE WOW ITS LIKE THE PERFECT SHAPE TO FLOW DOWN AND DROP LIKE THAT AND THEN I REALIZED IT WAS A BUNCH OF MINIATURE DICKS SO I WAS JUST„, “OH”

I thought they were peanuts

At first glance I saw jellybeans

I thought they were babies help

I thought it was a human spine…..

The dicks only make it better

WAY TO CUT OFF THE BEST PART OF THE WHOLE GIF

(Source: nutnics)

Sep 11 '14

9/11

Never forget the 15K+ people America killed because we wanted to get back at an extremist group for destroying the lives of 3k innocents.

You’re focusing on the problem. If you focus on the problem, you can’t see the solution. Never focus on the problem! 
See what no one else sees. See what everyone chooses not to see… out of fear, conformity or laziness. See the whole world anew each day! “

Arthur Mendelson from Patch Adams

Sep 11 '14

I wonder when the RPG community for video games will realize that levels are an obsolete system and are not needed.

I mean, its not like pen and paper where you become a god near the end. Its just strong skills. Leveling does nothing but make you limited from playing a character.